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Behav Brain Res. 2015 Sep 1;290:197-200. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2015.04.056. Epub 2015 May 11.

Visual inference of arm movement is constrained by motor representations.

Author information

1
Laboratório de Cognição Motora, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Belém, Pará, Brazil; Laboratório de Neurosplasticidade, Universidade Federal do Pará, Belém, Pará, Brazil. Electronic address: ghislain@ufpa.br.
2
INSERM U1093 Cognition Action Plasticité Sensorimotrice, Université de Bourgogne, Campus Universitaire, BP 27877, 21078 Dijon, France.
3
Laboratório de Neurobiologia II, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
4
INSERM U1093 Cognition Action Plasticité Sensorimotrice, Université de Bourgogne, Campus Universitaire, BP 27877, 21078 Dijon, France; Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, RBCS Dept., Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova, Italy; Institut Universitaire de France, Université de Bourgogne, Campus Universitaire, BP 27877, 21078 Dijon, France.

Abstract

Several studies support the idea that motion inference is strongly motor dependent. In the present study, we address the role of biomechanical constraints in motion prediction and how this implicit knowledge can interfere in a spatial prediction task. Right-handed (RHS) and left-handed subjects (LHS) had to estimate the final position of a horizontal arm movement in which the final part of the trajectory was hidden. Our study highlighted a direction effect: end point prediction accuracy was better to infer the final position of horizontal motion directed toward the median line of human body. This finding suggests that the spatial prediction of end point is mapped onto implicit biomechanical knowledge such as joint limitation. Accordingly, motor repertoires are embodied into spatial prediction tasks.

KEYWORDS:

Biomechanical constraints; Motor system; Spatial prediction

PMID:
25975175
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbr.2015.04.056
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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