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Cell Host Microbe. 2015 May 13;17(5):690-703. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2015.04.004.

Dynamics and Stabilization of the Human Gut Microbiome during the First Year of Life.

Author information

1
The Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, 41345, Gothenburg, Sweden; Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Section for Metabolic Receptology and Enteroendocrinology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: fredrik.backhed@wlab.gu.se.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Hallands Hospital Halmstad, 30185 Halmstad, Sweden; Göteborg Paediatric Growth Research Center, Department of Paediatrics, the University of Gothenburg, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, 416 85 Gothenburg.
3
BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China.
4
BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China; Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
The Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, 41345, Gothenburg, Sweden.
6
BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China; Princess Al Jawhara Albrahim Center of Excellence in the Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.
7
Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
8
Göteborg Paediatric Growth Research Center, Department of Paediatrics, the University of Gothenburg, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, 416 85 Gothenburg; Research and Development Center Spenshult, 313 92 Oskarström, Sweden.
9
Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark; National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, N-5817 Bergen, Norway.
10
Göteborg Paediatric Growth Research Center, Department of Paediatrics, the University of Gothenburg, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, 416 85 Gothenburg. Electronic address: jovanna.dahlgren@vgregion.se.
11
BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China; Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark; Princess Al Jawhara Albrahim Center of Excellence in the Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia; Macau University of Science and Technology, Avenida Wai long, Taipa, Macau 999078, China; Department of Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, University of Hong Kong, 21 Sassoon Road, Hong Kong. Electronic address: wangj@genomics.org.cn.

Erratum in

Abstract

The gut microbiota is central to human health, but its establishment in early life has not been quantitatively and functionally examined. Applying metagenomic analysis on fecal samples from a large cohort of Swedish infants and their mothers, we characterized the gut microbiome during the first year of life and assessed the impact of mode of delivery and feeding on its establishment. In contrast to vaginally delivered infants, the gut microbiota of infants delivered by C-section showed significantly less resemblance to their mothers. Nutrition had a major impact on early microbiota composition and function, with cessation of breast-feeding, rather than introduction of solid food, being required for maturation into an adult-like microbiota. Microbiota composition and ecological network had distinctive features at each sampled stage, in accordance with functional maturation of the microbiome. Our findings establish a framework for understanding the interplay between the gut microbiome and the human body in early life.

PMID:
25974306
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2015.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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