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Cell Host Microbe. 2015 May 13;17(5):603-16. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2015.04.009.

Microbiota and Host Nutrition across Plant and Animal Kingdoms.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Microbe Interactions, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany.
2
Department of Plant Microbe Interactions, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany; Department of Algorithmic Bioinformatics, Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany; Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences (CEPLAS), Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
4
Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0845, USA.
5
Department of Algorithmic Bioinformatics, Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany; Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences (CEPLAS), Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany; Computational Biology of Infection Research, Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. Electronic address: alice.mchardy@helmholtz-hzi.de.
6
Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: dangl@email.unc.edu.
7
Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; Department of Computer Sciences and Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: robknight@ucsd.edu.
8
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA; Department of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. Electronic address: rel222@cornell.edu.
9
Department of Plant Microbe Interactions, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany; Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences (CEPLAS), Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany. Electronic address: schlef@mpipz.mpg.de.

Abstract

Plants and animals each have evolved specialized organs dedicated to nutrient acquisition, and these harbor specific bacterial communities that extend the host's metabolic repertoire. Similar forces driving microbial community establishment in the gut and plant roots include diet/soil-type, host genotype, and immune system as well as microbe-microbe interactions. Here we show that there is no overlap of abundant bacterial taxa between the microbiotas of the mammalian gut and plant roots, whereas taxa overlap does exist between fish gut and plant root communities. A comparison of root and gut microbiota composition in multiple host species belonging to the same evolutionary lineage reveals host phylogenetic signals in both eukaryotic kingdoms. The reasons underlying striking differences in microbiota composition in independently evolved, yet functionally related, organs in plants and animals remain unclear but might include differences in start inoculum and niche-specific factors such as oxygen levels, temperature, pH, and organic carbon availability.

PMID:
25974302
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2015.04.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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