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Sci Rep. 2015 May 14;5:10241. doi: 10.1038/srep10241.

Lung microbiota across age and disease stage in cystic fibrosis.

Author information

1
Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
Centre for the Analysis of Genome Evolution and Function, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Latner Thoracic Surgery Laboratories, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
1] Latner Thoracic Surgery Laboratories, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada [2] Department of Pathology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Adult Cystic Fibrosis Clinic, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
6
1] Department of Pediatric Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada [2] Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
7
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
8
1] Latner Thoracic Surgery Laboratories, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada [2] Department of Pathology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada [3] Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
9
1] Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada [2] Centre for the Analysis of Genome Evolution and Function, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Understanding the significance of bacterial species that colonize and persist in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways requires a detailed examination of bacterial community structure across a broad range of age and disease stage. We used 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing to characterize the lung microbiota in 269 CF patients spanning a 60 year age range, including 76 pediatric samples from patients of age 4-17, and a broad cross-section of disease status to identify features of bacterial community structure and their relationship to disease stage and age. The CF lung microbiota shows significant inter-individual variability in community structure, composition and diversity. The core microbiota consists of five genera - Streptococcus, Prevotella, Rothia, Veillonella and Actinomyces. CF-associated pathogens such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, Stenotrophomonas and Achromobacter are less prevalent than core genera, but have a strong tendency to dominate the bacterial community when present. Community diversity and lung function are greatest in patients less than 10 years of age and lower in older age groups, plateauing at approximately age 25. Lower community diversity correlates with worse lung function in a multivariate regression model. Infection by Pseudomonas correlates with age-associated trends in community diversity and lung function.

PMID:
25974282
PMCID:
PMC4431465
DOI:
10.1038/srep10241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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