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Prev Chronic Dis. 2015 May 14;12:E74. doi: 10.5888/pcd12.140520.

Changes in Georgia restaurant and bar smoking policies from 2006 to 2012.

Author information

1
P.O. Box 3995, Atlanta, GA 30302-3995. Email: rchandora1@student.gsu.edu.
2
Georgia State University, School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The purpose of this study is to examine the change in smoking policy status among Georgia restaurants and bars from 2006 to 2012 and to identify restaurant and bar characteristics that are associated with allowing smoking.

METHODS:

Data were obtained from similar cross-sectional indoor air surveys conducted in 2006 and 2012 in Georgia. Both surveys were designed to gather information about restaurant and bar smoking policies. Weighted χ(2) analyses were performed to identify changes in smoking policy status and other variables from 2006 to 2012. Weighted logistic regression analysis was used to test for significant associations between an establishment's smoking policy and other characteristics.

RESULTS:

The percentage of restaurants and bars in Georgia that allowed smoking nearly doubled, from 9.1% in 2006 to 17.6% in 2012. The analyses also showed a significant increase in the percentage of establishments that allow smoking when minors are present. Having a liquor license was a significant predictor of allowing smoking.

CONCLUSION:

The Smokefree Air Act was enacted in 2005 to protect the health and welfare of Georgia citizens, but study results suggest that policy makers should reevaluate the law and consider strengthening it to make restaurants and bars 100% smokefree without exemptions.

PMID:
25974144
PMCID:
PMC4438425
DOI:
10.5888/pcd12.140520
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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