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J Altern Complement Med. 2015 Jun;21(6):327-32. doi: 10.1089/acm.2014.0389. Epub 2015 May 14.

Impact of a Yoga Intervention on Physical Activity, Self-Efficacy, and Motivation in Women with PTSD Symptoms.

Author information

1
1Department of Behavioral Science, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.
2
2Department of Psychology, Suffolk University, Boston, MA.
3
3Women's Health Sciences Division, National Center for PTSD, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA.
4
4Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies using yoga have demonstrated initial efficacy for treating symptoms across anxiety disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder.

OBJECTIVE:

Understanding how interventions influence participants' physical activity and what determinants affect continued physical activity behavior change is important because maintenance of the behavior may be critical to continued mental health gains and symptom reduction.

METHODS:

This study investigated change in physical activity and possible psychological mechanisms of physical activity behavior change, including self-efficacy and regulatory motivation, in a randomized controlled trial of yoga for women with post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms (n=38).

RESULTS:

Growth curve modeling results showed no significant changes in physical activity or self-efficacy for either group, whereas external motivation decreased significantly in the yoga group but not in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Investigators of future yoga interventions may want to focus on increasing self-efficacy and internal regulatory motivation, so that physical activity and resultant symptom relief can be maintained.

PMID:
25973554
PMCID:
PMC4486144
DOI:
10.1089/acm.2014.0389
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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