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Ann Saudi Med. 2014 Nov-Dec;34(6):517-21. doi: 10.5144/0256-4947.2014.517.

Disruptive behavior in Down syndrome children: a cross-sectional comparative study.

Author information

1
Abdel-Hady El-Hadidy, MD, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health,, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516,, Egypt 00201060714481, ahgilany@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Down syndrome (DS) is associated with intellectual disability, and patients with DS show significant psychopathology. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of disruptive behavior in DS patients compared to their siblings, and to find any association between the disruptive behavior and the degree of intelligence.

DESIGN AND SETTINGS:

This is a cross-sectional comparative study done in Mansoura University Children's Hospital during the period March 1, 2012-February 28, 2013.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

In this study, 100 cases of DS and an equal number of their brothers/sisters were enrolled in the study. The Arabic version of Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale was used for assessing social and mental intelligence quotient (IQ). The Arabic version of Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children (MINI-KID) and disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) rating scale were used for assessing disruptive behavior disorders.

RESULTS:

Both social and mental IQs were significantly higher in non-DS than in DS cases. The prevalence of different variants of attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD)-impulsive, inattentive, and combined types-was significantly lower in non-DS than in DS cases; however, there was no statistical difference between both groups as regards oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder (CD). Also among DS cases, impulsive and combined types varied significantly with the degree of their IQ.

CONCLUSION:

ADHD was more common among DS patients with a special impact of IQ on the type of psychiatric illness. We recommend psychiatric assessment for DS patients as a part of multidisciplinary management.

PMID:
25971826
PMCID:
PMC6074581
DOI:
10.5144/0256-4947.2014.517
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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