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J Cancer Educ. 2016 Mar;31(1):191-7. doi: 10.1007/s13187-015-0854-8.

Lessons Learned from Implementing a Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment Program for Underserved High-Risk Men in the Community: the Prostate REACH Project.

Author information

1
Center for Injury Research and Prevention, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
2
Office of Health Communications and Health Disparities, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
3
Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, Division of Population Sciences, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA.
4
Division of Population Science, Department of Medical Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, 1025 Walnut Street, Room 1015, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USA.
5
Department of Clinical Genetics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
6
National Comprehensive Cancer Center, Fort Washington, PA, USA.
7
Division of Population Science, Department of Medical Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, 1025 Walnut Street, Room 1015, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USA. Veda.Giri@jefferson.edu.

Abstract

Prostate cancer disproportionately affects Black men, who may also encounter barriers to participation in prostate cancer risk assessment. The Prostate Risk, Education and Assessment in the Community with Help (REACH) project was a community-based extension of a comprehensive prostate cancer risk assessment program at a comprehensive cancer center. The goals of the REACH project were the following: (1) establish a community prostate cancer risk assessment clinic, (2) conduct targeted recruitment, and (3) provide navigation services including follow-up for uninsured men. Key implementation steps included the following: (1) choosing a clinic site, (2) establishing patient access procedures, (3) establishing navigator services, (4) developing subsidy fund use guidelines, and (5) designing recruitment and promotion. Through community-based promotion, 64 men inquired about the program and 26 (41 %) participated. Of those screened, 46 % had abnormal results, and 2 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Here, we describe a unique demonstration project to implement a comprehensive prostate cancer risk assessment program in an underserved Black community and describe successes and challenges to inform future efforts to promote access to underserved men.

KEYWORDS:

African American; Community screening; Prostate cancer screening

PMID:
25971432
DOI:
10.1007/s13187-015-0854-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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