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J Pediatr Psychol. 2015 Oct;40(9):904-13. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsv036. Epub 2015 May 11.

Profiles of Connectedness: Processes of Resilience and Growth in Children With Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Department of Psychology, The University of Memphis.
2
Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and.
3
Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and sean.phipps@stjude.org.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Identified patterns of connectedness in youth with cancer and demographically similar healthy peers.

METHOD:

Participants included 153 youth with a history of cancer and 101 youth without a history of serious illness (8-19 years). Children completed measures of connectedness, posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), and benefit-finding. Parents also reported on children's PTSS.

RESULTS:

Latent profile analysis revealed four profiles: high connectedness (45%), low connectedness (6%), connectedness primarily to parents (40%), and connectedness primarily to peers (9%). These profiles did not differ by history of cancer. However, profiles differed on PTSS and benefit-finding. Children highly connected across domains displayed the lowest PTSS and highest benefit-finding, while those with the lowest connectedness had the highest PTSS, with moderate PTSS and benefit-finding for the parent and peer profiles.

CONCLUSION:

Children with cancer demonstrate patterns of connectedness similar to their healthy peers. Findings support connectedness as a possible mechanism facilitating resilience and growth.

KEYWORDS:

adjustment; cancer; children; connectedness; resilience

PMID:
25968051
PMCID:
PMC4580758
DOI:
10.1093/jpepsy/jsv036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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