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Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2015 May 13;12:60. doi: 10.1186/s12966-015-0221-5.

Mediating role of television time, diet patterns, physical activity and sleep duration in the association between television in the bedroom and adiposity in 10 year-old children.

Author information

1
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, K1H 8L1, ON, Canada. mborg031@gmail.com.
2
School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. mborg031@gmail.com.
3
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, K1H 8L1, ON, Canada. mtremblay@cheo.on.ca.
4
School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. mtremblay@cheo.on.ca.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. mtremblay@cheo.on.ca.
6
Population Health, Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. mtremblay@cheo.on.ca.
7
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Peter.Katzmarzyk@pbrc.edu.
8
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Catrine.Tudor-Locke@pbrc.edu.
9
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. John.Schuna@pbrc.edu.
10
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, K1H 8L1, ON, Canada. geled@me.com.
11
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, K1H 8L1, ON, Canada. charlesboyer613@hotmail.com.
12
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, K1H 8L1, ON, Canada. alleblanc@cheo.on.ca.
13
Population Health, Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. alleblanc@cheo.on.ca.
14
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, K1H 8L1, ON, Canada. jpchaput@cheo.on.ca.
15
School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. jpchaput@cheo.on.ca.
16
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. jpchaput@cheo.on.ca.
17
Population Health, Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. jpchaput@cheo.on.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Having a TV in the bedroom is associated with adiposity in children. It is not known how lifestyle behaviours (television viewing time, diet patterns, physical activity, and sleep duration) mediate this association. The objective of this study was to examine the mediating role of these lifestyle behaviours in the association between TV in the bedroom and percent body fat (% BF).

METHODS:

Cross-sectional data from 1 201 children (57.3% female; mean age = 9.8 years) from Ottawa, Canada and Baton Rouge, USA were examined. % BF was directly measured. Accelerometers were used to determine physical activity and sleep duration (24-h, 7-day protocol). Questionnaires were used to assess TV viewing time and healthy/unhealthy diet patterns (derived using factor analysis from food frequency questionnaire data).

RESULTS:

Canadian boys and girls with a TV in their bedroom had a higher % BF, watched more TV and had unhealthier diets. American boys and girls with a TV in their bedroom watched more TV, while boys had a higher % BF and a more unhealthy diet, and girls had less MVPA. In Canadian girls, TV viewing time mediated the association between having a TV in the bedroom and adiposity, independent of diet patterns, MVPA, and sleep duration. Other lifestyle mediators were not significant in Canadian boys or in US children.

CONCLUSION:

TV viewing is a mediating lifestyle behaviour in the association between TV in the bedroom and adiposity in Canadian girls. Future research is needed to identify lifestyle behaviours as intermediate mediators.

PMID:
25967920
PMCID:
PMC4434872
DOI:
10.1186/s12966-015-0221-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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