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J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2015 Aug;35(8):1233-6. doi: 10.1038/jcbfm.2015.100. Epub 2015 May 13.

Erythropoietin dampens injury-induced microglial motility.

Author information

1
Light Microscopy Facility, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, Göttingen, Germany.
2
Clinical Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, Göttingen, Germany.
3
Department of Cellular Neurobiology, Institute of Zoology, Georg-August-University, Göttingen, Germany.
4
1] Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology Group, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, Göttingen, Germany [2] Center for Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CNMPB), Göttingen, Germany.
5
Institute of Neuropathology, Georg-August-University, Göttingen, Germany.
6
1] Center for Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CNMPB), Göttingen, Germany [2] Department of Neurogenetics, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, Göttingen, Germany.
7
1] Clinical Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, Göttingen, Germany [2] Center for Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CNMPB), Göttingen, Germany.

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury causes progressive brain atrophy and cognitive decline. Surprisingly, an early treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) prevents these consequences of secondary neurodegeneration, but the mechanisms have remained obscure. Here we show by advanced imaging and innovative analytical tools that recombinant human EPO, a clinically established and neuroprotective growth factor, dampens microglial activity, as visualized also in vivo by a strongly attenuated injury-induced cellular motility.

PMID:
25966953
PMCID:
PMC4527993
DOI:
10.1038/jcbfm.2015.100
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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