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Transplantation. 2015 Oct;99(10):2083-94. doi: 10.1097/TP.0000000000000744.

Development of a Minor Histocompatibility Antigen Vaccine Regimen in the Canine Model of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

Author information

1
1 Division of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. 2 Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 3 The Center for Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 4 Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 5 The Washington National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 6 Division of Vaccine and Infectious Disease, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. 7 Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Minor histocompatibility antigen (miHA) vaccines have the potential to augment graft-versus-tumor effects without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We used mixed hematopoietic chimerism in the canine model of major histocompatibility complex-matched allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation as a platform to develop a miHA vaccination regimen.

METHODS:

We engineered DNA plasmids and replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 constructs encoding large sections of canine SMCY and the entire canine SRY gene.

RESULTS:

Priming with replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 constructs and boosting with ex vivo plasmid-transfected dendritic cells and cutaneous delivery of plasmids with a particle-mediated epidermal delivery device (PMED) in 2 female dogs induced antigen-specific T-cell responses. Similar responses were observed after a prime-boost vaccine regimen in three female hematopoietic cell transplantation donors. Subsequent donor lymphocyte infusion resulted in a significant change of chimerism in 1 of 3 male recipients without any signs of graft-versus-host disease. The change in chimerism in the recipient occurred in association with the development of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to the same peptide pools detected in the donor.

CONCLUSIONS:

These studies describe the first in vivo response to miHA vaccination in a large, outbred animal model without using recipient cells to sensitize the donor. This model provides a platform for ongoing experiments designed to define optimal miHA targets and develop protocols to directly vaccinate the recipient.

PMID:
25965411
PMCID:
PMC4591091
DOI:
10.1097/TP.0000000000000744
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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