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Chem Biol. 2015 May 21;22(5):671-82. doi: 10.1016/j.chembiol.2015.04.014. Epub 2015 May 9.

Optogenetic control of molecular motors and organelle distributions in cells.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
2
Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Department of Biochemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
3
Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address: bcui@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Intracellular transport and distribution of organelles play important roles in diverse cellular functions, including cell polarization, intracellular signaling, cell survival, and apoptosis. Here, we report an optogenetic strategy to control the transport and distribution of organelles by light. This is achieved by optically recruiting molecular motors onto organelles through the heterodimerization of Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) and its interacting partner CIB1. CRY2 and CIB1 dimerize within subseconds upon exposure to blue light, which requires no exogenous ligands and low intensity of light. We demonstrate that mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lysosomes can be driven toward the cell periphery upon light-induced recruitment of kinesin, or toward the cell nucleus upon recruitment of dynein. Light-induced motor recruitment and organelle movements are repeatable, reversible, and can be achieved at subcellular regions. This light-controlled organelle redistribution provides a new strategy for studying the causal roles of organelle transport and distribution in cellular functions in living cells.

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PMID:
25963241
PMCID:
PMC4443846
DOI:
10.1016/j.chembiol.2015.04.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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