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Neuron. 2015 May 20;86(4):1041-1054. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.04.007. Epub 2015 May 7.

Theta Burst Firing Recruits BDNF Release and Signaling in Postsynaptic CA1 Neurons in Spike-Timing-Dependent LTP.

Author information

1
Institut für Physiologie, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Medizinische Fakultät, Leipziger Str. 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany. Electronic address: elke.edelmann@med.ovgu.de.
2
Institut für Physiologie, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Medizinische Fakultät, Leipziger Str. 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.
3
Institut für Physiologie, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Medizinische Fakultät, Leipziger Str. 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany; Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, Otto-von-Guericke University, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg, Germany.
4
Institut für Physiologie, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Medizinische Fakultät, Leipziger Str. 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany; Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, Otto-von-Guericke University, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg, Germany. Electronic address: lessmann@med.ovgu.de.

Abstract

Timing-dependent LTP (t-LTP) is a physiologically relevant type of synaptic plasticity that results from repeated sequential firing of action potentials (APs) in pre- and postsynaptic neurons. t-LTP can be observed in vivo and is proposed to be a cellular correlate of memory formation. While brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential to high-frequency stimulation-induced LTP in many brain areas, the role of BDNF in t-LTP is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate a striking change in the expression mechanism of t-LTP in CA1 of the hippocampus following two distinct modes of synaptic activation. Single postsynaptic APs paired with presynaptic stimulation activated a BDNF-independent canonical t-LTP. In contrast, a theta burst of postsynaptic APs preceded by presynaptic stimulation elicited BDNF-dependent postsynaptic t-LTP that relied on postsynaptic BDNF secretion. This suggests that BDNF release during burst-like patterns of activity typically observed in vivo may play a crucial role during memory formation.

PMID:
25959732
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2015.04.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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