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Neuron. 2015 May 20;86(4):971-984. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.03.064. Epub 2015 May 7.

Functional assembly of accessory optic system circuitry critical for compensatory eye movements.

Author information

1
The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
2
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Department of Neuroscience, Department of Ophthalmology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
3
Division of Molecular Neuroscience, National Institute for Basic Biology, 5-1 Higashiyama, Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki 444-8787, Japan.
4
Department of Neurosciences, Neurobiology Section in the Division of Biological Sciences, Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 92093, USA.
5
The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Electronic address: kolodkin@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

Accurate motion detection requires neural circuitry that compensates for global visual field motion. Select subtypes of retinal ganglion cells perceive image motion and connect to the accessory optic system (AOS) in the brain, which generates compensatory eye movements that stabilize images during slow visual field motion. Here, we show that the murine transmembrane semaphorin 6A (Sema6A) is expressed in a subset of On direction-selective ganglion cells (On DSGCs) and is required for retinorecipient axonal targeting to the medial terminal nucleus (MTN) of the AOS. Plexin A2 and A4, two Sema6A binding partners, are expressed in MTN cells, attract Sema6A(+) On DSGC axons, and mediate MTN targeting of Sema6A(+) RGC projections. Furthermore, Sema6A/Plexin-A2/A4 signaling is required for the functional output of the AOS. These data reveal molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of AOS circuits critical for moving image perception.

PMID:
25959730
PMCID:
PMC4441577
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2015.03.064
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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