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Dent Mater. 2015 Jul;31(7):778-88. doi: 10.1016/j.dental.2015.03.014. Epub 2015 May 6.

Fatigue failure of dentin-composite disks subjected to cyclic diametral compression.

Author information

1
Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics (MDRCBB), School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, MN, USA.
2
Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics (MDRCBB), School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, MN, USA; Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, MN, USA.
3
Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, MN, USA.
4
Department of Developmental and Surgical Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, MN, USA.
5
Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics (MDRCBB), School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, MN, USA. Electronic address: alexfok@umn.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our aim was to establish the relationship between cyclic loading and fatigue life of the dentin-composite interface using the newly developed disk in diametral compression tests. The results were then used to estimate the fatigue life of restored teeth under occlusal loading.

METHODS:

Disk specimens (5mm dia.×2mm thick) were prepared using bovine incisors and restored with either a methacrylate-based composite Z100™ with Adper Single Bond Plus (Z100) or silorane-based composite Filtek™ LS with LS System adhesive (LS). The dentin-composite disks were tested under cyclic diametral compression to determine the number of cycles to failure (Nf) at three load levels (n=3 per group). Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to calculate the interfacial stresses (σ) within the specimen, to establish the σ vs. Nf curves, and those within a restored tooth under normal chewing forces (15N maximum). These were then used to estimate the lifetime of the restored tooth for the two restorative systems.

RESULTS:

The disks restored with LS had a higher fatigue resistance than those restored with Z100. The maximum interfacial stress in the restored tooth determined by FEA was ∼0.5MPa. Based on the estimate of 300,000 cycles of chewing per year, the predicted lifetime under occlusal loading for teeth restored with LS and Z100 was 33 and 10 years, respectively.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The disk in cyclic diametral compression has been used successfully to provide fatigue data which allows the lifetime of composite-restored teeth under occlusal loading to be predicted using numerical simulation.

KEYWORDS:

Composite resin; Dental restorations; Diametral compression; Fatigue lifetime; Finite element analysis; Interfacial integrity

PMID:
25958269
PMCID:
PMC4461523
DOI:
10.1016/j.dental.2015.03.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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