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Eur J Cancer. 2015 Jul;51(10):1203-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2015.04.002. Epub 2015 May 6.

Survivorship after childhood cancer: PanCare: a European Network to promote optimal long-term care.

Author information

1
Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: Lars.Hjorth@med.lu.se.
2
Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Genova, Italy.
3
Great North Children's Hospital, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.
4
German Childhood Cancer Registry, University Medical Centre Mainz, Germany.
5
Boyne Research Institute, Drogheda, Ireland.
6
Austrian Childhood Cancer Organisation, Vienna, Austria.
7
Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
8
University of Lucerne, Lucerne, Switzerland.
9
Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
10
2nd Department of Pediatrics, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
11
Kinder und Jugendklinik, Universität Erlangen, CCC ErMN, Erlangen, Germany.
12
Institut Gustave Roussy, Paris, France.
13
Institute of Primary and Community Care, Lucerne, Switzerland.
14
St. Anna Children's Hospital, Vienna, Austria.
15
Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
16
University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
17
Fondazione MBBM, Monza, Italy.
18
Wroclaw University, Wroclaw, Poland.
19
University Hospital Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
20
Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
21
St Hilda's College, Oxford, UK.
22
Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori Milano, Italy.
23
Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Abstract

Survival after childhood cancer has improved substantially over recent decades. Although cancer in childhood is rare increasingly effective treatments have led to a growing number of long-term survivors. It is estimated that there are between 300,000 and 500,000 childhood cancer survivors in Europe. Such good survival prospects raise important questions relating to late effects of treatment for cancer. Research has shown that the majority will suffer adverse health outcomes and premature mortality compared with the general population. While chronic health conditions are common among childhood cancer survivors, each specific type of late effect is very rare. Long-term effects must be considered particularly when addressing complex multimodality treatments, and taking into account the interaction between aspects of treatment and genotype. The PanCare Network was set up across Europe in order to effectively answer many of these questions and thereby improve the care and quality of life of survivors. The need for a structured long-term follow-up system after childhood cancer has been recognised for some time and strategies for implementation have been developed, first nationally and then trans-nationally, across Europe. Since its first meeting in Lund in 2008, the goal of the PanCare Network has been to coordinate and implement these strategies to ensure that every European survivor of childhood and adolescent cancer receives optimal long-term care. This paper will outline the structure and work of the PanCare Network, including the results of several European surveys, the start of two EU-funded projects and interactions with relevant stakeholders and related projects.

KEYWORDS:

Childhood cancer; Late effects; Long-term care; Long-term follow-up; Survivorship

PMID:
25958037
PMCID:
PMC5916870
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejca.2015.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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