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J Am Board Fam Med. 2015 May-Jun;28(3):306-10. doi: 10.3122/jabfm.2015.03.140246.

Health information technology needs help from primary care researchers.

Author information

1
From the Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (AHK, RLP); the Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (LAG); the American Board of Family Medicine, Washington, DC (RLP); the Departments of Family Medicine and Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison (JWB); OCHIN, Portland, OR (JED, JP, TB); the Departments of Family Medicine and Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland (JED, TB); the Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (MSK); the Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec Canada (JH); and the Department of Family Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (CHF). ahkrist@vcu.edu.
2
From the Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (AHK, RLP); the Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (LAG); the American Board of Family Medicine, Washington, DC (RLP); the Departments of Family Medicine and Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison (JWB); OCHIN, Portland, OR (JED, JP, TB); the Departments of Family Medicine and Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland (JED, TB); the Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (MSK); the Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec Canada (JH); and the Department of Family Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (CHF).

Abstract

While health information technology (HIT) efforts are beginning to yield measurable clinical benefits, more is needed to meet the needs of patients and clinicians. Primary care researchers are uniquely positioned to inform the evidence-based design and use of technology. Research strategies to ensure success include engaging patient and clinician stakeholders, working with existing practice-based research networks, and using established methods from other fields such as human factors engineering and implementation science. Policies are needed to help support primary care researchers in evaluating and implementing HIT into everyday practice, including expanded research funding, strengthened partnerships with vendors, open access to information systems, and support for the Primary Care Extension Program. Through these efforts, the goal of improved outcomes through HIT can be achieved.

PMID:
25957361
PMCID:
PMC4450103
DOI:
10.3122/jabfm.2015.03.140246
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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