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PLoS One. 2015 May 8;10(5):e0125422. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0125422. eCollection 2015.

Long-Term Burden and Respiratory Effects of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Hospitalization in Preterm Infants-The SPRING Study.

Author information

1
Neonatology Service, Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi Suñer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain.
2
Division of Pediatric Respiratory Medicine, Hospital Universitario Donostia-Instituto Biodonostia, San Sebastián, Spain; Biomedical Research Centre Network for Respiratory Diseases (CIBERES), San Sebastián, Spain; Department of Pediatrics, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), San Sebastián, Spain.
3
Neonatology Unit, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain.
4
Neonatology Service, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba, Spain.
5
Health Outcomes Research Department, 3D Health Research, Barcelona, Spain.
6
Neonatology Division, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Hospital General Universitario "Gregorio Marañón", Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

The health status of premature infants born 321-350 weeks' gestational age (wGA) hospitalized for RSV infection in the first year of life (cases; n = 125) was compared to that of premature infants not hospitalized for RSV (controls; n = 362) through 6 years. The primary endpoints were the percentage of children with wheezing between 2-6 years and lung function at 6 years of age. Secondary endpoints included quality of life, healthcare resource use, and allergic sensitization. A significantly higher proportion of cases than controls experienced recurrent wheezing through 6 years of age (46.7% vs. 27.4%; p = 0.001). The vast majority of lung function tests appeared normal at 6 years of age in both cohorts. In children with pulmonary function in the lower limit of normality (FEV1 Z-score [-2; -1]), wheezing was increased, particularly for cases vs. controls (72.7% vs. 18.9%, p = 0.002). Multivariate analysis revealed the most important factor for wheezing was RSV hospitalization. Quality of life on the respiratory subscale of the TAPQOL was significantly lower (p = 0.001) and healthcare resource utilization was significantly higher (p<0.001) in cases than controls. This study confirms RSV disease is associated with wheezing in 32-35 wGA infants through 6 years of age.

PMID:
25955487
PMCID:
PMC4425575
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0125422
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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