Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2015 Aug;70(8):2241-8. doi: 10.1093/jac/dkv109. Epub 2015 May 7.

Parallel evolutionary pathways to antibiotic resistance selected by biocide exposure.

Author information

1
Antimicrobials Research Group, School of Immunity and Infection and Institute for Microbiology and Infection, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK m.a.webber@bham.ac.uk.
2
Antimicrobials Research Group, School of Immunity and Infection and Institute for Microbiology and Infection, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
3
School of Bioscience and Institute for Microbiology & Infection, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
4
Division of Microbiology and Infection, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Biocides are widely used to prevent infection. We aimed to determine whether exposure of Salmonella to various biocides could act as a driver of antibiotic resistance.

METHODS:

Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was exposed to four biocides with differing modes of action. Antibiotic-resistant mutants were selected during exposure to all biocides and characterized phenotypically and genotypically to identify mechanisms of resistance.

RESULTS:

All biocides tested selected MDR mutants with decreased antibiotic susceptibility; these occurred randomly throughout the experiments. Mutations that resulted in de-repression of the multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC were seen in MDR mutants. A novel mutation in rpoA was also selected and contributed to the MDR phenotype. Other mutants were highly resistant to both quinolone antibiotics and the biocide triclosan.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study shows that exposure of bacteria to biocides can select for antibiotic-resistant mutants and this is mediated by clinically relevant mechanisms of resistance prevalent in human pathogens.

KEYWORDS:

MDR; disinfectant; efflux

PMID:
25953808
PMCID:
PMC4500774
DOI:
10.1093/jac/dkv109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center