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Acta Bioeng Biomech. 2015;17(1):95-101.

Biomechanical parameters in lower limbs during natural walking and Nordic walking at different speeds.

Author information

1
Institute of Physiotherapy in the Locomotor System,University School of Physical Education, Wrocław, Poland.
2
Institute of Biostructure, University School of Physical Education, Wrocław, Poland.
3
Institute for Bioeingineering, Brunel University of West London.
4
Institute of Physiology and Biochemistry, University School of Physical Education, Wrocław, Poland.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Nordic Walking (NW) is a sport that has a number of benefits as a rehabilitation method. It is performed with specially designed poles and has been often recommended as a physical activity that helps reduce the load to limbs. However, some studies have suggested that these findings might be erroneous.

STUDY AIM:

The aim of this paper was to compare the kinematic, kinetic and dynamic parameters of lower limbs between Natural Walking (W) and Nordic Walking (NW) at both low and high walking speeds.

METHODS:

The study used a registration system, BTS Smart software and Kistler platform. Eleven subjects walked along a 15-metre path at low (below 2 m⋅s-1) and high (over 2 m⋅s-1) walking speeds. The Davis model was employed for calculations of kinematic, kinetic and dynamic parameters of lower limbs.

RESULTS:

With constant speed, the support given by Nordic Walking poles does not make the stroke longer and there is no change in pelvic rotation either. The only change observed was much bigger pelvic anteversion in the sagittal plane during fast NW. There were no changes in forces, power and muscle torques in lower limbs.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study found no differences in kinematic, kinetic and dynamic parameters between Natural Walking (W) and Nordic Walking (NW). Higher speeds generate greater ground reaction forces and muscle torques in lower limbs. Gait parameters depend on walking speed rather than on walking style.

PMID:
25951842
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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