Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Prev Med. 2015 Apr 10;6:33. doi: 10.4103/2008-7802.154922. eCollection 2015.

High flow nasal cannula as a method for rapid weaning from nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Child Growth and Development Center, Isfahan, Iran.
2
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To compare two methods of weaning premature infants from nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP).

METHODS:

Between March and November 2012, 88 preterm infants who were stable on NCPAP of 5 cmH2O with FIO2 <30% for a minimum of 6 h were randomly allocated to one of two groups. The high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) group received HFNC with flow of 2 L/min and FIO2 = 0.3 and then stepwise reduction of FIO2 and then flow. The non-HFNC group was maintained on NCPAP of 5 cmH2O and gradual reduction of oxygen until they were on FIO2 = 0.21 for 6 h, and we had weaned them directly from NCPAP (with pressure of 5 cmH2O) to room air.

RESULTS:

No significant differences were found between 2 study groups with regards to gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score at 1 and 5 min after birth, patent ductus arteriosus and use of xanthines. The mean duration of oxygen therapy after randomization was significantly lower in HFNC group compared to non-HFNC group (20.6 ± 16.8 h vs. 49.6 ± 25.3 h, P < 0.001). Also, the mean length of hospital stay was significantly lower in HFNC group compared to non-HFNC group (11.3 ± 7.8 days vs. 14.8 ± 8.6 days, P = 0.04). The rate of successful weaning was not statistically different between two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Weaning from NCPAP to HFNC could decrease the duration of oxygen therapy and length of hospitalization in preterm infants.

KEYWORDS:

Continuous positive airway pressure; high flow nasal cannula; preterm infant; weaning

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Medknow Publications and Media Pvt Ltd Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center