Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Cancer Educ. 2016 Sep;31(3):430-42. doi: 10.1007/s13187-015-0853-9.

Young Adult Cancer Survivors' Experience with Cancer Treatment and Follow-Up Care and Perceptions of Barriers to Engaging in Recommended Care.

Author information

1
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University School of Public Health, Room 524, 1518 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA. cjberg@emory.edu.
2
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University School of Public Health, Room 524, 1518 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.
3
Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Woodruff Health Sciences Center, Emory University, 1440 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.
4
Aflac Cancer Center/Department of Pediatrics, Department of Oncology, School of Medicine, Woodruff Health Sciences Center, Emory University, 1440 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.

Abstract

We examined correlates of low engagement in the healthcare system, experiences with survivorship care, barriers to follow-up care, and potential resources for promoting follow-up care among young adult survivors of childhood cancers. We conducted a mixed-method study involving surveys of 106 survivors of childhood cancer aged 18-34 recruited from a university-affiliated children's hospital and an NCI-designated cancer center in the Southeastern USA. Phone-based semistructured interviews were then conducted in a subset of 26. Assessments included health factors, psychosocial factors, healthcare system interaction, and interest in resources to promote engagement in healthcare. Survey participants were on average 22.14 (SD = 3.16) years old, 50.0 % female, and 77.4 % White. Overall, 46.0 % had attended survivorship clinic, 47.2 % reported receiving a treatment summary, 68.9 % had a primary care provider, and 17.0 % reported no interaction with healthcare in the past 2 years. Correlates of less than annual healthcare provider visits included being older (p = 0.003), being male (p < 0.001), lack of insurance (p = 0.002), and having had chemotherapy (p = 0.05). Participants reported varied experiences in terms of how health and treatment information was presented, from none or too little to overwhelming or anxiety-provoking amounts. Barriers to engaging in survivorship care included no/limited insurance, time, or transportation; major life changes; anxiety; and difficulty transitioning from pediatrics to adult care. Participants highlighted the need for educational and psychosocial resources, particularly technology-based resources. Multilevel interventions are needed to increase engagement in survivorship care among young adult cancer survivors. Technology-based resources addressing social support and mental well-being are intervention possibilities.

KEYWORDS:

Childhood cancer; Survivorship care plans; Transition to survivorship; Young adults

PMID:
25948413
PMCID:
PMC4712118
DOI:
10.1007/s13187-015-0853-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center