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Sci Transl Med. 2015 May 6;7(286):286re5. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa2373.

Prime-boost vaccination with chimpanzee adenovirus and modified vaccinia Ankara encoding TRAP provides partial protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection in Kenyan adults.

Author information

1
Centre for Geographic Medicine Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, PO Box 230, 80108 Kilifi, Kenya.
2
Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, Oxford OX3 7BN, UK.
3
The Jenner Institute, Oxford OX3 7BN, UK.
4
European Vaccine Initiative, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
5
ReiThera, Viale Città d'Europa 679, 00144 Rome, Italy.
6
CEINGE, Via Gaetano Salvatore 486, 80145 Naples, Italy.
7
Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology, University of Naples Federico II, Via S. Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy.
8
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Protective immunity to the liver stage of the malaria parasite can be conferred by vaccine-induced T cells, but no subunit vaccination approach based on cellular immunity has shown efficacy in field studies. We randomly allocated 121 healthy adult male volunteers in Kilifi, Kenya, to vaccination with the recombinant viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), both encoding the malaria peptide sequence ME-TRAP (the multiple epitope string and thrombospondin-related adhesion protein), or to vaccination with rabies vaccine as a control. We gave antimalarials to clear parasitemia and conducted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis on blood samples three times a week to identify infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. On Cox regression, vaccination reduced the risk of infection by 67% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33 to 83%; P = 0.002] during 8 weeks of monitoring. T cell responses to TRAP peptides 21 to 30 were significantly associated with protection (hazard ratio, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.75; P = 0.016).

PMID:
25947165
PMCID:
PMC4687051
DOI:
10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa2373
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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