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Nature. 2015 May 14;521(7551):173-179. doi: 10.1038/nature14447. Epub 2015 May 6.

Complex archaea that bridge the gap between prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

Author information

1
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden.
2
Department of Biology, Centre for Geobiology, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.
3
Division of Archaea Biology and Ecogenomics, Department of Ecogenomics and Systems Biology, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.
4
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden.
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Contributed equally

Abstract

The origin of the eukaryotic cell remains one of the most contentious puzzles in modern biology. Recent studies have provided support for the emergence of the eukaryotic host cell from within the archaeal domain of life, but the identity and nature of the putative archaeal ancestor remain a subject of debate. Here we describe the discovery of 'Lokiarchaeota', a novel candidate archaeal phylum, which forms a monophyletic group with eukaryotes in phylogenomic analyses, and whose genomes encode an expanded repertoire of eukaryotic signature proteins that are suggestive of sophisticated membrane remodelling capabilities. Our results provide strong support for hypotheses in which the eukaryotic host evolved from a bona fide archaeon, and demonstrate that many components that underpin eukaryote-specific features were already present in that ancestor. This provided the host with a rich genomic 'starter-kit' to support the increase in the cellular and genomic complexity that is characteristic of eukaryotes.

PMID:
25945739
PMCID:
PMC4444528
DOI:
10.1038/nature14447
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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