Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Sep 1;61(5):809-16. doi: 10.1093/cid/civ366. Epub 2015 May 5.

Raltegravir in HIV-1-Infected Pregnant Women: Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Efficacy.

Author information

1
Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
2
Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves, Granada, Spain.
3
Saint-Pierre University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium.
4
Klinik für Geburtsmedizin, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin.
5
Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt, Medizinische Klinik II, Germany.
6
Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, 'Lluita contra la Sida' Foundation, Badalona, Spain.
7
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
8
Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
9
Klinikum der Universität München, Frauenklinik Innenstadt, Munich, Germany.
10
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom.
11
National Institute for Infectious Diseases 'L. Spallanzani,' Rome.
12
University of Padua, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The use of raltegravir in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pregnant women is important in the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission, especially in circumstances when a rapid decline of HIV RNA load is warranted or when preferred antiretroviral agents cannot be used. Physiological changes during pregnancy can reduce antiretroviral drug exposure. We studied the effect of pregnancy on the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir and its safety and efficacy in HIV-infected pregnant women.

METHODS:

An open-label, multicenter, phase 4 study in HIV-infected pregnant women receiving raltegravir 400 mg twice daily was performed (Pharmacokinetics of Newly Developed Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women Network). Steady-state pharmacokinetic profiles were obtained in the third trimester and postpartum along with cord and maternal delivery concentrations. Safety and virologic efficacy were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Twenty-two patients were included, of which 68% started raltegravir during pregnancy. Approaching delivery, 86% of the patients had an undetectable viral load (<50 copies/mL). None of the children were HIV-infected. Exposure to raltegravir was highly variable. Overall area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and plasma concentration at 12 hours after intake (C12h) plasma concentrations in the third trimester were on average 29% and 36% lower, respectively, compared with postpartum: Geometric mean ratios (90% confidence interval) were 0.71 (.53-.96) for AUC0-12h and 0.64 (.34-1.22) for C12h. The median ratio of raltegravir cord to maternal blood was 1.21 (interquartile range, 1.02-2.17; n = 9).

CONCLUSIONS:

Raltegravir was well tolerated during pregnancy. The pharmacokinetics of raltegravir showed extensive variability. The observed mean decrease in exposure to raltegravir during third trimester compared to postpartum is not considered to be of clinical importance. Raltegravir can be used in standard dosages in HIV-infected pregnant women.

CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION:

NCT00825929.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; MTCT; pharmacokinetics; pregnancy; raltegravir

PMID:
25944344
DOI:
10.1093/cid/civ366
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center