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Sci Rep. 2015 May 6;5:9871. doi: 10.1038/srep09871.

Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests.

Author information

1
1] Silviculture and Forest Ecological Studies, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8689, Japan [2] Institute of Sustainable Plant Protection, National Research Council of Italy, Via Madonna del Piano, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence, Italy.
2
1] Research Group for Environmental Science, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki, 319-1195 Japan [2] Atmospheric Environmental Research, Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kreuzeckbahnstr. 19, 82467, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.
3
Atmospheric Environment and Applied Meteorology Research Department, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan.
4
Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu 183-8509, Japan.
5
Silviculture and Forest Ecological Studies, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8689, Japan.
6
Institute of Sustainable Plant Protection, National Research Council of Italy, Via Madonna del Piano, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence, Italy.

Abstract

Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19(th) century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected.

PMID:
25943276
PMCID:
PMC4421795
DOI:
10.1038/srep09871
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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