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BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2015 May 6;16:107. doi: 10.1186/s12891-015-0562-x.

Productivity at work and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Author information

1
Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. m.vanvilsteren@vumc.nl.
2
Body@Work, Research Center Physical Activity, TNO-VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. m.vanvilsteren@vumc.nl.
3
Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. crl.boot@vumc.nl.
4
Body@Work, Research Center Physical Activity, TNO-VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. crl.boot@vumc.nl.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. d.knol@vumc.nl.
6
Jan van Breemen Research Institute Reade, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. d.v.schaardenburg@reade.nl.
7
Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ae.voskuyl@vumc.nl.
8
Body@Work, Research Center Physical Activity, TNO-VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. romy.steenbeek@tno.nl.
9
TNO Work, Health and Care, Leiden, The Netherlands. romy.steenbeek@tno.nl.
10
Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. h.anema@vumc.nl.
11
Body@Work, Research Center Physical Activity, TNO-VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. h.anema@vumc.nl.
12
Research Center for Insurance Medicine AMC-UMCG-UWV-VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. h.anema@vumc.nl.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to determine which combination of personal, disease-related and environmental factors is best associated with at-work productivity loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to determine whether at-work productivity loss is associated with the quality of life for these patients.

METHODS:

This study is based on cross-sectional data. Patients completed a questionnaire with personal, disease-related and environmental factors (related to the work environment), and clinical characteristics were obtained from patient medical records. At-work productivity loss was measured with the Work Limitations Questionnaire, and quality of life with the RAND 36. Using linear regression analyses, a multivariate model was built containing the combination of factors best associated with at-work productivity loss. This model was cross-validated internally. We furthermore determined whether at-work productivity loss was associated with quality of life using linear regression analyses.

RESULTS:

We found that at-work productivity loss was associated with workers who had poorer mental health, more physical role limitations, were ever treated with a biological therapeutic medication, were not satisfied with their work, and had more work instability (R(2) = 0.50 and R(2) following cross-validation was 0.32). We found that at-work productivity loss was negatively associated with health-related quality of life, especially with dimensions of mental health, physical role limitations, and pain.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found that at-work productivity loss was associated with personal, work-related, and clinical factors. Although our study results should be interpreted with caution, they provide insight into patients with RA who are at risk for at-work productivity loss.

PMID:
25940578
PMCID:
PMC4425924
DOI:
10.1186/s12891-015-0562-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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