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Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2015 Aug;9(4):430-9. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2015.24. Epub 2015 May 5.

Core Competencies in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance: A Systematic Review.

Author information

1
1CRIMEDIM,Università del Piemonte Orientale,Novara,Italy.
2
2URGENTA,Clinical Emergency Hospital,Bucharest,Romania.
3
3Hanover Associates,Teddington,London,UK.
4
4NHCS,National Health Career School of Management,Hennigsdorf/Berlin,Germany.
5
5Bonn International Center for Conversion,Bonn,University Clinic Bonn Department of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery,Bonn,Germany.
6
6CROUMSA,Croatian Urgent Medicine and Surgery Association,Slav. Brod,Croatia.
7
7Prehospital and Disaster Medicine Centre,Sahlgrenska Academy,Gothenburg,Sweden.
8
8SBC,General & Teaching Hospital Celje, Medical Faculty Ljubljana,Slovenia.
9
9German Aerospace Center (DLR),Oberpfaffenhofen,Germany.
10
10Global Risk Forum GRF Davos,Davos,Switzerland.
11
11Clinical Emergency Hospital Bucharest,Romania.
12
12Harvard Humanitarian Initiative,Cambridge,Massachusetts.

Abstract

Disaster response demands a large workforce covering diverse professional sectors. Throughout this article, we illustrate the results of a systematic review of peer-reviewed studies to identify existing competency sets for disaster management and humanitarian assistance that would serve as guidance for the development of a common disaster curriculum. A systematic review of English-language articles was performed on PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, ERIC, and Cochrane Library. Studies were included if reporting competency domains, abilities, knowledge, skills, or attitudes for professionals involved disaster relief or humanitarian assistance. Exclusion criteria included abstracts, citations, case studies, and studies not dealing with disasters or humanitarian assistance. Thirty-eight papers were analyzed. Target audience was defined in all articles. Five references (13%) reported cross-sectorial competencies. Most of the articles (81.6%) were specific to health care. Eighteen (47%) papers included competencies for at least 2 different disciplines and 18 (47%) for different professional groups. Nursing was the most widely represented cadre. Eighteen papers (47%) defined competency domains and 36 (94%) reported list of competencies. Nineteen articles (50%) adopted consensus-building to define competencies, and 12 (31%) included competencies adapted to different professional responsibility levels. This systematic review revealed that the largest number of papers were mainly focused on the health care sector and presented a lack of agreement on the terminology used for competency-based definition.

KEYWORDS:

competency-based education; disaster medicine education; humanitarian aid; professionalization

PMID:
25939807
DOI:
10.1017/dmp.2015.24
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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