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Acta Paediatr. 2015 Aug;104(8):815-22. doi: 10.1111/apa.13036. Epub 2015 May 29.

Psychological wellbeing in 20-year-old adults receiving repeated lifestyle counselling since infancy.

Author information

1
Unit of Personality, Work and Health Psychology, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
2
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
3
Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
4
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
5
Sports and Exercise Medicine Unit, Paavo Nurmi Centre, Department of Physical Activity and Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
6
Unit of Psychology, Faculty of Education, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
7
Turku Institute for Child and Youth Research, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
8
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland.
9
Department of Paediatrics, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
10
Department of Medicine, University of Turku and Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
11
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.

Abstract

AIM:

This study examined whether there was an association between a repeated dietary and lifestyle intervention that began in infancy and participants' psychological wellbeing at the age of 20.

METHODS:

We examined the psychological wellbeing of 457 young adults participating in the Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP), a randomised controlled trial conducted in Finland between 1989 and 2011. We assessed potential differences in psychological wellbeing between the intervention and control groups by examining participants' satisfaction with life, how they rated their health, their experiences of stress and the consequences of experiencing stress and symptoms of depression at the age of 20. We also assessed socio-economic status during childhood as a potential confounding factor.

RESULTS:

We found no association between the long-term dietary and lifestyle intervention and participants' psychological wellbeing in adulthood. Adjusting for sex and childhood socio-economic status did not affect the results and socio-economic status did not moderate the association between the intervention and psychological wellbeing.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings showed no association between intensive dietary and lifestyle counselling that was initiated in infancy with psychological wellbeing in adulthood and the initiative did not appear to pose any psychological risks.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Lifestyle; Long-term trial; Nutrition; Psychological wellbeing

PMID:
25939586
DOI:
10.1111/apa.13036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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