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Pediatr Res. 2015 Aug;78(2):158-64. doi: 10.1038/pr.2015.85. Epub 2015 May 4.

Antioxidation improves in puberty in normal weight and obese boys, in positive association with exercise-stimulated growth hormone secretion.

Author information

1
1] Endocrine Unit, Aretaieion Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece [2] First Department of Pediatrics, "Aghia Sofia" Children's Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece.
2
School of Physical Education and Sports Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, Komotini, Greece.
3
First Department of Pediatrics, "Aghia Sofia" Children's Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece.
4
Endocrine Unit, Evgenidion Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece.
5
Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Third Department of Pediatrics, Hippokrateion General Hospital of Thessaloniki, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
6
Endocrine Unit, Aretaieion Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Oxidative stress is associated with obesity while the evidence for the role of GH in pro- and antioxidation is inconclusive. This study investigates the relationships between growth hormone (GH), pro- and antioxidation in relation to obesity and puberty before and after an acute bout of exercise.

METHODS:

In this case-control study, 76 healthy normal-weight and obese, prepubertal and pubertal boys underwent a blood sampling before and immediately after an aerobic exercise bout until exhaustion at 70% maximal oxygen consumption. Markers of prooxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and protein carbonyls (PCs)) and antioxidation (glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione disulfide (GSSG), GSH/GSSG ratio, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC)) and hormones (GH, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, IGF-BP-3, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and testosterone) were measured.

RESULTS:

Baseline and postexercise TBARS and PCs were greater, while baseline GSH, GSH/GSSG ratio, GPX, and TAC were lower in obese than that in normal-weight participants. In all participants, waist was the best negative and positive predictor for postexercise GPX and TBARS, respectively. Baseline TAC was greater in pubertal than that in pre-pubertal participants. In all participants, baseline GH was the best negative predictor for postexercise PCs. Significant positive linear correlation exists between the exercise-associated GH, and GSSG increases in pubertal normal-weight boys.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher prooxidation and lower antioxidation were observed in obese boys, while antioxidation improves with puberty and postexercise, paralleling GH accentuated secretion.

PMID:
25938733
DOI:
10.1038/pr.2015.85
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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