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J Vis Exp. 2015 Apr 19;(98). doi: 10.3791/52626.

Electrospun nanofiber scaffolds with gradations in fiber organization.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mary & Dick Holland Regenerative Medicine Program, University of Nebraska Medical Center.
2
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University.
3
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mary & Dick Holland Regenerative Medicine Program, University of Nebraska Medical Center; Jingwei.xie@unmc.edu.

Abstract

The goal of this protocol is to report a simple method for generating nanofiber scaffolds with gradations in fiber organization and test their possible applications in controlling cell morphology/orientation. Nanofiber organization is controlled with a new fabrication apparatus that enables the gradual decrease of fiber organization in a scaffold. Changing the alignment of fibers is achieved through decreasing deposition time of random electrospun fibers on a uniaxially aligned fiber mat. By covering the collector with a moving barrier/mask, along the same axis as fiber deposition, the organizational structure is easily controlled. For tissue engineering purposes, adipose-derived stem cells can be seeded to these scaffolds. Stem cells undergo morphological changes as a result of their position on the varied organizational structure, and can potentially differentiate into different cell types depending on their locations. Additionally, the graded organization of fibers enhances the biomimicry of nanofiber scaffolds so they more closely resemble the natural orientations of collagen nanofibers at tendon-to-bone insertion site compared to traditional scaffolds. Through nanoencapsulation, the gradated fibers also afford the possibility to construct chemical gradients in fiber scaffolds, and thereby further strengthen their potential applications in fast screening of cell-materials interaction and interfacial tissue regeneration. This technique enables the production of continuous gradient scaffolds, but it also can potentially produce fibers in discrete steps by controlling the movement of the moving barrier/mask in a discrete fashion.

PMID:
25938562
PMCID:
PMC4541585
DOI:
10.3791/52626
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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