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Neurosci Lett. 2015 Jun 15;597:164-9. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2015.04.047. Epub 2015 Apr 30.

Potential interactions between pericytes and oligodendrocyte precursor cells in perivascular regions of cerebral white matter.

Author information

1
Neuroprotection Research Laboratory, Departments of Radiology and Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, USA.
2
Department of Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Japan.
3
Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Japan.
4
Laboratory of Neurogenesis and CNS Repair, Institute for Advanced Medical Science, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan.
5
Department of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan.
6
Neuroprotection Research Laboratory, Departments of Radiology and Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, USA. Electronic address: karai@partners.org.

Abstract

Pericytes are embedded within basal lamina and play multiple roles in the perivascular niche in brain. Recently, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have also been reported to associate with cerebral endothelium. Is it possible that within this gliovascular locus, there may also exist potential spatial and functional interactions between pericytes and OPCs? Here, we demonstrated that in the perivascular region of cerebral white matter, pericytes and OPCs may attach and support each other. Immunostaining showed that pericytes and OPCs are localized in close contact with each other in mouse white matter at postnatal days 0, 60 and 240. Electron microscopic analysis confirmed that pericytes attached to OPCs via basal lamina in the perivascular region. The close proximity between these two cell types was also observed in postmortem human brains. Functional interaction between pericytes and OPCs was assessed by in vitro media transfer experiments. When OPC cultures were treated with pericyte-conditioned media, OPC number increased. Similarly, pericyte number increased when pericytes were maintained in OPC-conditioned media. Taken together, our data suggest a potential anatomical and functional interaction between pericytes and OPCs in cerebral white matter.

KEYWORDS:

Oligodendrocyte precursor cell; Pericyte; Perivascular niche; White matter

PMID:
25936593
PMCID:
PMC4443478
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2015.04.047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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