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J Laryngol Otol. 2015 Jun;129(6):544-7. doi: 10.1017/S0022215115000845. Epub 2015 May 4.

Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with severe tinnitus: prospective, controlled clinical study.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology,Dumlupınar University,Kutahya.
2
Department of Internal Medicine,Dumlupınar University Evliya Celebi Education and Research Hospital,Kutahya.
3
Department of Otorhinolaryngology,Susehri State Hospital,Sivas,Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the relationship between severe tinnitus and inflammation using the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as a marker of stress.

METHODS:

A total of 107 patients who had been suffering with severe tinnitus (tinnitus handicap inventory scale grades of 3-5) for at least 2 weeks were recruited. Patients underwent detailed ENT examinations and audiometric tests to exclude a relevant pathological cause of the tinnitus. Patients with systemic diseases, malignancy or inflammatory diseases that could alter neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio were excluded. A total of 107 age- and sex-matched healthy control participants were also recruited. Routine laboratory test results and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio were compared between the patients and controls.

RESULTS:

Lipid profile, liver function, white blood cell count, haemoglobin level, mean corpuscular volume, and vitamin B12 and folate levels were similar among the patients and controls. However, mean neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was significantly higher among the patients than the controls (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The findings of this novel study suggest that neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio should be considered during the evaluation of tinnitus patients as a potential clinical marker of tinnitus. Further studies are required to verify the findings.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical Marker; Inflammation; Physiological; Stress; Tinnitus

PMID:
25936355
DOI:
10.1017/S0022215115000845
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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