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Interv Neuroradiol. 2015 Feb;21(1):108-13. doi: 10.1177/1591019915576666.

Head and neck neurovascular trauma: Clinical and angiographic correlation.

Author information

1
FCS Neurosurgery, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
2
FCS Neurosurgery, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa allan.taylor@uct.ac.za.

Abstract

A retrospective review of all angiograms done for craniocervical trauma, over an eight-year period at Groote Schuur Hospital identified 61 patients out of 823 angiographically studied who had extradural vascular injury and required endovascular treatment. Multiple lesions were identified in nine (14,8%) patients and associated injuries were found in 23 patients (37%). The mechanism of injury was blunt in nine (14.8%) patients and penetrating in 52 (85.2%). There was a statistically significant correlation between the presenting clinical feature and the underlying angiographic lesion. Patients with active bleeding were more likely to have a vessel laceration, an expanding hematoma was associated with false aneurysm and a pulsatile mass with arteriovenous fistula. Endovascular treatment with emphasis on vessel occlusion rather than preservation was successful in all cases except one which required surgical vessel ligation.

KEYWORDS:

Head and neck; arteriovenous fistula; false aneurysm; neurovascular; trauma

PMID:
25934784
PMCID:
PMC4757196
DOI:
10.1177/1591019915576666
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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