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Prosthet Orthot Int. 2016 Jun;40(3):400-3. doi: 10.1177/0309364615579317. Epub 2015 May 1.

Development of novel 3D-printed robotic prosthetic for transradial amputees.

Author information

1
Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA.
2
Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
3
Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA goldfarbc@wudosis.wustl.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM:

Upper extremity myoelectric prostheses are expensive. The Robohand demonstrated that three-dimensional printing reduces the cost of a prosthetic extremity. The goal of this project was to develop a novel, inexpensive three-dimensional printed prosthesis to address limitations of the Robohand.

TECHNIQUE:

The prosthesis was designed for patients with transradial limb amputation. It is shoulder-controlled and externally powered with an anthropomorphic terminal device. The user can open and close all five fingers, and move the thumb independently. The estimated cost is US$300.

DISCUSSION:

After testing on a patient with a traumatic transradial amputation, several advantages were noted. The independent thumb movement facilitated object grasp, the device weighed less than most externally powered prostheses, and the size was easily scalable. Limitations of the new prosthetic include low grip strength and decreased durability compared to passive prosthetics.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Most children with a transradial congenital or traumatic amputation do not use a prosthetic. A three-dimensional printed shoulder-controlled robotic prosthesis provides a cost effective, easily sized and highly functional option which has been previously unavailable.

KEYWORDS:

Transradial amputation; congenital; limb differences; prosthesis; prosthetic arm; three-dimensional printing

PMID:
25934422
DOI:
10.1177/0309364615579317
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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