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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2015 Aug;96(8):1506-17. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.04.011. Epub 2015 Apr 28.

Association between rotation-related impairments and activity type in people with and without low back pain.

Author information

1
Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.
2
Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. Electronic address: vandillenl@wusm.wustl.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether people with low back pain (LBP) who regularly participated in a rotation-related activity displayed more rotation-related impairments than people without LBP who did and did not participate in the activity.

DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of data from a case-control study.

SETTING:

Musculoskeletal analysis laboratory at an academic medical center.

PARTICIPANTS:

A convenience sample of participants with LBP (n=55) who participated in a rotation-related sport, back-healthy controls (n=26) who participated in a rotation-related sport, and back-healthy controls (n=42) who did not participate in a rotation-related sport. Participants were matched based on age, sex, and activity level.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The total number of rotation-related impairments and asymmetrical rotation-related impairments identified during a standardized clinical examination.

RESULTS:

Compared with the back-healthy controls who do not play a rotation-related sport group, both the LBP and back-healthy controls who play a rotation-related sport groups displayed significantly more (1) rotation-related impairments (LBP, P<.001; back-healthy controls who play a rotation-related sport, P=.015), (2) asymmetrical rotation-related impairments (LBP, P=.006; back-healthy controls who play a rotation-related sport, P=.020), and (3) rotation-related impairments with trunk movement tests (LBP, P=.002; back-healthy controls who play a rotation-related sport, P<.001). The LBP group had significantly more rotation-related impairments with extremity movement tests than both of the back-healthy groups (back-healthy controls who play a rotation-related sport, P=.011; back-healthy controls who do not play a rotation-related sport, P<.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The LBP and back-healthy controls who play a rotation-related sport groups demonstrated a similar number of total rotation-related impairments and asymmetrical rotation-related impairments, and these numbers were greater than those of the back-healthy controls who do not play a rotation-related sport group. Compared with people without LBP, people with LBP displayed more rotation-related impairments when moving an extremity. These findings suggest that impairments associated with extremity movements may be associated with having an LBP condition.

KEYWORDS:

Low back pain; Rehabilitation; Rotation; Spine; Sports

PMID:
25933914
PMCID:
PMC4519377
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2015.04.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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