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J Strength Cond Res. 2015 Jul;29(7):1821-9. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000970.

Influence of Resistance Training Frequency on Muscular Adaptations in Well-Trained Men.

Author information

1
1Department of Health Sciences, CUNY Lehman College, Bronx, New York; 2Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, New Jersey; 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; and 4Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training muscle groups 1 day per week using a split-body routine (SPLIT) vs. 3 days per week using a total-body routine (TOTAL) on muscular adaptations in well-trained men. Subjects were 20 male volunteers (height = 1.76 ± 0.05 m; body mass = 78.0 ± 10.7 kg; age = 23.5 ± 2.9 years) recruited from a university population. Participants were pair matched according to baseline strength and then randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 experimental groups: a SPLIT, where multiple exercises were performed for a specific muscle group in a session with 2-3 muscle groups trained per session (n = 10) or a TOTAL, where 1 exercise was performed per muscle group in a session with all muscle groups trained in each session (n = 10). Subjects were tested pre- and poststudy for 1 repetition maximum strength in the bench press and squat, and muscle thickness (MT) of forearm flexors, forearm extensors, and vastus lateralis. Results showed significantly greater increases in forearm flexor MT for TOTAL compared with SPLIT. No significant differences were noted in maximal strength measures. The findings suggest a potentially superior hypertrophic benefit to higher weekly resistance training frequencies.

PMID:
25932981
DOI:
10.1519/JSC.0000000000000970
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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