Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2015 Apr 30;10(4):e0126684. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0126684. eCollection 2015.

State-dependent changes in auditory sensory gating in different cortical areas in rats.

Author information

1
School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, P. R. China; State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, P. R. China.
2
State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, P. R. China; Yunnan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Kunming, P. R. China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, P. R. China; State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, P. R. China; Yunnan Key Laboratory of Primate Biomedical Research, Kunming, Yunnan, P.R. China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, P. R. China; Yunnan Key Laboratory of Primate Biomedical Research, Kunming, Yunnan, P.R. China.

Abstract

Sensory gating is a process in which the brain's response to a repetitive stimulus is attenuated; it is thought to contribute to information processing by enabling organisms to filter extraneous sensory inputs from the environment. To date, sensory gating has typically been used to determine whether brain function is impaired, such as in individuals with schizophrenia or addiction. In healthy subjects, sensory gating is sensitive to a subject's behavioral state, such as acute stress and attention. The cortical response to sensory stimulation significantly decreases during sleep; however, information processing continues throughout sleep, and an auditory evoked potential (AEP) can be elicited by sound. It is not known whether sensory gating changes during sleep. Sleep is a non-uniform process in the whole brain with regional differences in neural activities. Thus, another question arises concerning whether sensory gating changes are uniform in different brain areas from waking to sleep. To address these questions, we used the sound stimuli of a Conditioning-testing paradigm to examine sensory gating during waking, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and Non-REM (NREM) sleep in different cortical areas in rats. We demonstrated the following: 1. Auditory sensory gating was affected by vigilant states in the frontal and parietal areas but not in the occipital areas. 2. Auditory sensory gating decreased in NREM sleep but not REM sleep from waking in the frontal and parietal areas. 3. The decreased sensory gating in the frontal and parietal areas during NREM sleep was the result of a significant increase in the test sound amplitude.

PMID:
25928147
PMCID:
PMC4415925
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0126684
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center