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Mol Cell Proteomics. 2015 Jul;14(7):1885-97. doi: 10.1074/mcp.M114.045781. Epub 2015 Apr 29.

Understanding the Mechanism of Thermotolerance Distinct From Heat Shock Response Through Proteomic Analysis of Industrial Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Author information

1
From the ‡Key Laboratory of Systems Microbial Biotechnology, Tianjin Institute of Industrial Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianjin 300308, China; shui_wq@tib.cas.cn wang_qh@tib.cas.cn.
2
From the ‡Key Laboratory of Systems Microbial Biotechnology, Tianjin Institute of Industrial Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianjin 300308, China;
3
§College of Life Sciences and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China.

Abstract

Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been intensively studied in responses to different environmental stresses such as heat shock through global omic analysis. However, the S. cerevisiae industrial strains with superior thermotolerance have not been explored in any proteomic studies for elucidating the tolerance mechanism. Recently a new diploid strain was obtained through evolutionary engineering of a parental industrial strain, and it exhibited even higher resistance to prolonged thermal stress. Herein, we performed iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis on both the parental and evolved industrial strains to further understand the mechanism of thermotolerant adaptation. Out of ∼ 2600 quantifiable proteins from biological quadruplicates, 193 and 204 proteins were differentially regulated in the parental and evolved strains respectively during heat-stressed growth. The proteomic response of the industrial strains cultivated under prolonged thermal stress turned out to be substantially different from that of the laboratory strain exposed to sudden heat shock. Further analysis of transcription factors underlying the proteomic perturbation also indicated the distinct regulatory mechanism of thermotolerance. Finally, a cochaperone Mdj1 and a metabolic enzyme Adh1 were selected to investigate their roles in mediating heat-stressed growth and ethanol production of yeasts. Our proteomic characterization of the industrial strain led to comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of thermotolerance, which would facilitate future improvement in the industrially important trait of S. cerevisiae by rational engineering.

PMID:
25926660
PMCID:
PMC4587314
DOI:
10.1074/mcp.M114.045781
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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