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J Infect. 2015 Jun;71 Suppl 1:S80-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jinf.2015.04.025. Epub 2015 Apr 25.

New options in the treatment of respiratory syncytial virus disease.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Center for Vaccines and Immunity, Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205, USA. Electronic address: Asuncion.Mejias@nationwidechildrens.org.
2
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Center for Vaccines and Immunity, Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205, USA. Electronic address: octavio.ramilo@nationwidechildrens.org.

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in infants, immunocompromised patients and the elderly. Despite the high disease burden, an effective vaccine or specific therapy are lacking which is largely due to our limited understanding of the immune response to RSV and how it relates to clinical disease severity. Current treatment for RSV remains largely supportive and RSV-specific options for prophylaxis and/or treatment are limited to palivizumab and ribavirin. There are a number of promising compounds currently under development, including new monoclonal antibodies and small molecules. These newer antivirals have the potential to impact both the prevention and treatment of RSV disease in the main target populations.

KEYWORDS:

Antivirals; Children; Immune response; Monoclonal antibodies; RSV

PMID:
25922289
DOI:
10.1016/j.jinf.2015.04.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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