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Cell Rep. 2015 May 5;11(5):798-807. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.04.002. Epub 2015 Apr 23.

Astrocytes control food intake by inhibiting AGRP neuron activity via adenosine A1 receptors.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA.
2
Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA; Zhengzhou University People's Hospital (He'nan Provincial People's Hospital), Zhengzhou 450003, China.
3
Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA. Electronic address: yangyun@upstate.edu.

Abstract

It is well recognized that feeding behavior in mammals is orchestrated by neurons within the medial basal hypothalamus. However, it remains unclear whether food intake is also under the control of glial cells. Here, we combine chemical genetics, cell-type-specific electrophysiology, pharmacology, and feeding assays to show that stimulation of astrocytes within the medial basal hypothalamus reduces both basal- and ghrelin-evoked food intake. This occurs by a mechanism of adenosine-mediated inactivation of the orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AGRP) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) via adenosine A1 receptors. Our data suggest that glial cells participate in regulating food intake by modulating extracellular levels of adenosine. These findings reveal the existence of a glial relay circuit that controls feeding behavior, one that might serve as a target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of appetite disorders.

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PMID:
25921535
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2015.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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