Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Addict Biol. 2016 May;21(3):700-8. doi: 10.1111/adb.12240. Epub 2015 Apr 24.

From mother to child: orbitofrontal cortex gyrification and changes of drinking behaviour during adolescence.

Author information

1
Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
2
University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf, Clinic and Policlinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Germany.
3
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Neurospin, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France.
5
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, UK.
6
Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, UK.
8
Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Germany.
9
Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
10
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany.
11
Department of Addictive Behaviour and Addiction Medicine, Central Institute of Mental Health, Germany.
12
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM Unit 1000 'Imaging and Psychiatry', University Paris Sud, France.
13
AP-HP Department of Adolescent Psychopathology and Medicine, Maison de Solenn, University Paris Descartes, France.
14
Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Canada.
15
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Canada.
16
School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, UK.
17
Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Germany.
18
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
19
Neuroimaging Center, Department of Psychology, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
20
Charité University Medicine, St Hedwig Krankenhaus, Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Germany.

Abstract

Adolescence is a common time for initiation of alcohol use and alcohol use disorders. Importantly, the neuro-anatomical foundation for later alcohol-related problems may already manifest pre-natally, particularly due to smoking and alcohol consumption during pregnancy. In this context, cortical gyrification is an interesting marker of neuronal development but has not been investigated as a risk factor for adolescent alcohol use. On magnetic resonance imaging scans of 595 14-year-old adolescents from the IMAGEN sample, we computed whole-brain mean curvature indices to predict change in alcohol-related problems over the following 2 years. Change of alcohol use-related problems was significantly predicted from mean curvature in left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Less gyrification of OFC was associated with an increase in alcohol use-related problems over the next 2 years. Moreover, lower gyrification in left OFC was related to pre-natal alcohol exposure, whereas maternal smoking during pregnancy had no effect. Current alcohol use-related problems of the biological mother had no effect on offsprings' OFC gyrification or drinking behaviour. The data support the idea that alcohol consumption during pregnancy mediates the development of neuro-anatomical phenotypes, which in turn constitute a risk factor for increasing problems due to alcohol consumption in a vulnerable stage of life. Maternal smoking during pregnancy or current maternal alcohol/nicotine consumption had no significant effect. The OFC mediates behaviours known to be disturbed in addiction, namely impulse control and reward processing. The results stress the importance of pre-natal alcohol exposure for later increases in alcohol use-related problems, mediated by structural brain characteristics.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescence; alcohol use; dependence; gyrification; maternal drinking

PMID:
25913102
DOI:
10.1111/adb.12240
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center