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Adv Appl Microbiol. 2015;91:139-235. doi: 10.1016/bs.aambs.2014.12.002. Epub 2015 Feb 24.

Candida survival strategies.

Author information

1
Research Group Microbial Immunology, Hans-Knoell-Institute, Jena, Germany; Department Microbial Pathogenicity Mechanisms, Hans-Knoell-Institute, Jena, Germany.
2
Department Microbial Pathogenicity Mechanisms, Hans-Knoell-Institute, Jena, Germany; Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena, Germany; Center for Sepsis Control and Care, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany.
3
Research Group Microbial Immunology, Hans-Knoell-Institute, Jena, Germany; Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena, Germany.

Abstract

Only few Candida species, e.g., Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida dubliniensis, and Candida parapsilosis, are successful colonizers of a human host. Under certain circumstances these species can cause infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated candidiasis. The success of C. albicans, the most prevalent and best studied Candida species, as both commensal and human pathogen depends on its genetic, biochemical, and morphological flexibility which facilitates adaptation to a wide range of host niches. In addition, formation of biofilms provides additional protection from adverse environmental conditions. Furthermore, in many host niches Candida cells coexist with members of the human microbiome. The resulting fungal-bacterial interactions have a major influence on the success of C. albicans as commensal and also influence disease development and outcome. In this chapter, we review the current knowledge of important survival strategies of Candida spp., focusing on fundamental fitness and virulence traits of C. albicans.

KEYWORDS:

Adhesion; Biofilm; C. albicans; Immune evasion; Invasion; Morphology; Polymicrobial; Quorum sensing; Stress resistance; Survival

PMID:
25911234
DOI:
10.1016/bs.aambs.2014.12.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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