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Environ Pollut. 2015 Aug;203:183-90. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.03.032. Epub 2015 Apr 21.

A dominance shift from the zebra mussel to the invasive quagga mussel may alter the trophic transfer of metals.

Author information

1
Radboud University, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: J.Matthews@science.ru.nl.
2
Radboud University, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: A.Schipper@science.ru.nl.
3
Radboud University, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: A.J.Hendriks@science.ru.nl.
4
Radboud University, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: yenle@science.ru.nl.
5
Waterfauna Hydrobiologisch Adviesbureau, Oostrandpark 30, 8212 AP Lelystad, The Netherlands. Electronic address: vaate@planet.nl.
6
Naturalis Biodiversity Center, P.O. Box 9517, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands; Radboud University, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Department of Animal Ecology and Ecophysiology, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.vandervelde@science.ru.nl.
7
Radboud University, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: r.leuven@science.ru.nl.

Abstract

Bioinvasions are a major cause of biodiversity and ecosystem changes. The rapid range expansion of the invasive quagga mussel (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) causing a dominance shift from zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) to quagga mussels, may alter the risk of secondary poisoning to predators. Mussel samples were collected from various water bodies in the Netherlands, divided into size classes, and analysed for metal concentrations. Concentrations of nickel and copper in quagga mussels were significantly lower than in zebra mussels overall. In lakes, quagga mussels contained significantly higher concentrations of aluminium, iron and lead yet significantly lower concentrations of zinc66, cadmium111, copper, nickel, cobalt and molybdenum than zebra mussels. In the river water type quagga mussel soft tissues contained significantly lower concentrations of zinc66. Our results suggest that a dominance shift from zebra to quagga mussels may reduce metal exposure of predator species.

KEYWORDS:

Dreissenids; Food-web; Non-native; Predators; Species replacement

PMID:
25910461
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2015.03.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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