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Chem Biol Interact. 2015 Jul 25;237:47-57. doi: 10.1016/j.cbi.2015.04.013. Epub 2015 Apr 21.

Rosemary tea consumption results to anxiolytic- and anti-depressant-like behavior of adult male mice and inhibits all cerebral area and liver cholinesterase activity; phytochemical investigation and in silico studies.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Human and Animal Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Greece.
2
Department of Chemistry, Section of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina, Greece.
3
Department of Chemistry, Section of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina, Greece; Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Zografou 15771, Greece.
4
Plant Division, Department of Biology, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Greece.
5
Laboratory of Pharmacognosy & Chemistry of Natural Products, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece.
6
Department of Chemistry, Section of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina, Greece; CancerBiobank Center, University of Ioannina, GR45110 Ioannina, Greece. Electronic address: agtzakos@gmail.com.
7
Laboratory of Human and Animal Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Greece. Electronic address: margar@upatras.gr.

Abstract

Our aim was to investigate the possible effects of regular drinking of Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaf infusion on behavior and on AChE activity of mice. Rosemary tea (2% w/w) phytochemical profile was investigated through LC/DAD/ESI-MS(n). Adult male mice were randomly divided into two groups: "Rosemary-treated" that received orally the rosemary tea for 4weeks and "control" that received drinking water. The effects of regular drinking of rosemary tea on behavioral parameters were assessed by passive avoidance, elevated plus maze and forced swimming tests. Moreover, its effects on cerebral and liver cholinesterase (ChE) isoforms activity were examined colorimetricaly. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of diterpenes, flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic derivatives in rosemary tea; the major compounds were quantitatively determined. Its consumption rigorously affected anxiety/fear and depression-like behavior of mice, though memory/learning was unaffected. ChE isoforms activity was significantly decreased in brain and liver of "rosemary treated" mice. In order to explain the tissue ChE inhibition, principal component analysis, pharmacophore alignment and molecular docking were used to explore a possible relationship between main identified compounds of rosemary tea, i.e. rosmarinic acid, luteolin-7-O-glucuronide, caffeic acid and known AChE inhibitors. Results revealed potential common pharmacophores of the phenolic components with the inhibitors. Our findings suggest that rosemary tea administration exerts anxiolytic and antidepressant effects on mice and inhibits ChE activity; its main phytochemicals may function in a similar way as inhibitors.

KEYWORDS:

Cholinesterase; Elevated plus maze test; Forced swimming test; Molecular docking; Rosmarinus officinalis; Step-through passive avoidance test

PMID:
25910439
DOI:
10.1016/j.cbi.2015.04.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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