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Br Dent J. 2015 Apr 24;218(8):E14. doi: 10.1038/sj.bdj.2015.338.

Current UK dental sedation practice and the 'National Institute for Health and Care Excellence' (NICE) guideline 112: sedation in children and young people.

Author information

1
The University of Manchester London.
2
King's College London Dental Institute, Guy's Hospital, London.
3
Christopher Holden and Associates, 32 Tennyson Avenue, Chesterfield, Derbyshire.
4
School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol London.
5
Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London.
6
Highland View Dental Surgery, 229 Hornchurch Road, Hornchurch, Essex.
7
Eastman Dental Hospital for Oral Health Care Sciences, University College Hospital Foundation Trust, London.

Abstract

AIM:

Describe current dental sedation practice for under 19-year-olds in the UK and compare it with the recommendations of NICE guidance 112.

METHOD:

Members of the Society for the Advancement of Anaesthesia in Dentistry and members of the Dental Sedation Teachers Group were invited to participate in an online survey.

RESULTS:

Two hundred and sixty-six dentists and doctors completed the survey. Eighty-two percent were operator and sedationist (operator-sedationist). Ninety-five percent provided written information and 94% obtained written consent. Eighty-four percent kept a written or electronic sedation record. Eighty-six percent complied with life support training expectations. Eighty-six percent had immediate access to resuscitation equipment. Sixty-seven percent of sedationists reported that treatment could not be completed under sedation for <10% of cases during the previous year. When sedation was unsuccessful, 61% said they would schedule general anaesthesia and 54.5% would schedule advanced sedation care. Forty-nine percent believed that a dentist was an appropriate person to provide advanced sedation for 12-18 years. Only 24% thought a dentist should provide advanced sedation for children<12 years, with 75% preferring an anaesthetist. The appropriate setting for advanced sedation was thought to be primary care by 33% and secondary care by 68%.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found good agreement between the current practice of sedation and the recommendations of the NICE guidance 112.

PMID:
25908383
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bdj.2015.338
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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