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J Dent Res. 2015 Jul;94(7):921-7. doi: 10.1177/0022034515583531. Epub 2015 Apr 22.

Pyrosequencing Analysis of Subgingival Microbiota in Distinct Periodontal Conditions.

Author information

1
Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, DRI and BK21 Plus Program, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
2
School of Biosystem and Biomedical Science, Korea University, Seoul, Korea.
3
Division of High-Risk Pathogen Research, Center for Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Health, Chungbuk, Korea.
4
Department of Periodontology, Seoul National University Dental Hospital, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
5
Department of Conservative Dentistry, Seoul National University Dental Hospital, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
6
School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Chunlab, Inc., Seoul, Korea.
7
Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
8
Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, DRI and BK21 Plus Program, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea shhan-mi@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Subgingival microorganisms are potentially associated with periodontal diseases. However, changes in the subgingival microbiota during the progress of periodontal diseases are poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed bacterial communities in the subgingival paper point samples from 32 Korean individuals with no sign of disease, gingivitis, or periodontitis using 454 FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. A total of 256,113 reads representing 26 phyla, 433 genera, and 1,016 species were detected. Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Synergistetes, and Spirochaetes were the abundant phyla in periodontitis subjects, whereas Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were identified as the dominant phyla in the gingivitis and healthy subjects, respectively. Although high levels of Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Fretibacterium, Rothia, Filifactor, and Treponema genera were observed in the periodontitis subjects, Streptococcus, Capnocytophaga, Leptotrichia, and Haemophilus genera were found at high frequency in the gingivitis subjects. Species including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Fretibacterium fastidiosum were significantly increased in periodontitis subjects. On the other hand, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, and Leptotrichia hongkongensis were preferentially observed in the gingivitis subjects. Intriguingly, the halophile Halomonas hamiltonii was revealed as a predominant species in the healthy subjects. Based on Fast UniFrac analysis, distinctive bacterial clusters were classified for the healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis state. The current findings might be useful for understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal diseases.

KEYWORDS:

bacteria; dental plaque; gingival crevicular fluid; gingivitis; periodontal pocket; periodontitis

PMID:
25904141
DOI:
10.1177/0022034515583531
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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