Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2015 Jun;21(6):635-9. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2015.03.025. Epub 2015 Apr 9.

Occupational exposure to solvents, metals and welding fumes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80178, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.vandermark@uu.nl.
2
Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80178, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: r.c.h.vermeulen@uu.nl.
3
St Elisabeth Hospital, P.O. Box 90151, 5000 LC Tilburg, The Netherlands; TweeSteden Hospital, P.O. Box 90107, 5000 LA Tilburg, The Netherlands. Electronic address: nijssen2@xs4all.nl.
4
Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital, P.O. Box 9015, 6500 GS Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: w.mulleners@cwz.nl.
5
Vlietland Hospital, P.O. Box 215, 3100 AE Schiedam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: asas@vlietlandziekenhuis.nl.
6
University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: t.van.laar@umcg.nl.
7
Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80178, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.huss@uu.nl.
8
Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80178, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: h.kromhout@uu.nl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between occupational exposure to solvents, metals and/or welding fumes and risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD).

METHODS:

Data of a hospital based case-control study including 444 PD patients and 876 age and sex matched controls was used. Occupational histories and lifestyle information of cases and controls were collected in a structured telephone interview. Exposures to aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents and metals were estimated by linking the ALOHA+ job-exposure matrix to the occupational histories. Exposure to welding fumes was estimated using self-reported information on welding activities.

RESULTS:

No statistically significant associations with any of the studied metal and solvent exposures were found. However, for self-reported welding activities we observed non-statistically significant reduced risk estimates (third tertile cumulative exposure: OR = 0.51 (95% CI: 0.21-1.24)).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of our study did not provide support for an increased chance on developing PD after occupational exposure to aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents or exposure to metals. The results showed reduced risk estimates for welding, which is in line with previous research, but no clear explanation for these findings is available.

KEYWORDS:

Metals; Occupational exposures; Parkinson's disease; Solvents; Welding

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center