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Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2015 Jul;30(6):578-84. doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2015.04.002. Epub 2015 Apr 10.

Knee joint motion and muscle activation patterns are altered during gait in individuals with moderate hip osteoarthritis compared to asymptomatic cohort.

Author information

1
School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; School of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; School of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: djr@dal.ca.
2
School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; School of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: jmoreside@dal.ca.
3
School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; School of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: ivan.h.wong@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Knee replacements are common after hip replacement for end stage osteoarthritis. Whether abnormal knee mechanics exist in moderate hip osteoarthritis remains undetermined and has implications for understanding early osteoarthritis joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine whether three-dimensional (3D) knee motion and muscle activation patterns in individuals with moderate hip osteoarthritis differ from an asymptomatic cohort and whether these features differ between contra- and ipsilateral knees.

METHODS:

3D motions and medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstring surface electromyography were recorded on 20 asymptomatic individuals and 20 individuals with moderate hip osteoarthritis during treadmill walking, using standardized collection and processing procedures. Principal component analysis was used to derive electromyographic amplitude and temporal waveform features. 3D stance-phase range of motion was calculated. A 2-factor repeated analysis of variance determined significant within-group leg and muscle differences. Student's t-tests identified between group differences, with Bonferroni corrections where applicable (α=0.05).

FINDINGS:

Lower sagittal plane motion between early and mid/late stance (5°, P=0.004, effect size: 0.96) and greater mid-stance quadriceps activity was found in the osteoarthritis group (P=0.01). Compared to the ipsilateral knee, a borderline significant increase in mid-stance hamstring activity was found in the contra-lateral knee of the hip osteoarthritis group (P=0.018).

INTERPRETATION:

Bilateral knee mechanics were altered, suggesting potentially increased loads and knee muscle fatigue. There was no indication that one knee is more susceptible to osteoarthritis than the other, thus clinicians should include bilateral knee analysis when treating patients with hip osteoarthritis.

KEYWORDS:

Electromyography; Gait analysis; Hip osteoarthritis; Kinematics; Principal component analysis

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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